Recreation and leisure

Products

Social Capital (May 2014)

A newsletter issue for Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) exploring the importance of social capital in the lives of the people they support. Social capital is the value a person gets from participating in social networks, such as families, friends, school, work, and faith-based organizations. Involvement of people with disabilities in social networks also brings value to the community. Integrated communities provider richer experiences for all. These networks help people find jobs, homes, transportation, advisors, volunteer opportunities, and confidants. Individuals with developmental disabilities often have small social networks and limited opportunities to gain social capital, but families and DSPs understand this problem and this issue of *Frontline Initiative* may help solve it. (Publication Date: May 13, 2014)

Staff: Connie J Burkhart

Feature Issue on Stories of Advocacy, Stories of Change from People with Disabilities, Their Families, and Allies (1988-2013) (2014)

A newsletter issue featuring then-and-now personal stories from individuals with disabilities, their families, and allies that provide a snapshot of how the disability rights movement has touched individual lives over the past 25 years. This 25th anniversary issue of *Impact* brings together personal stories published in its pages between 1988-2010, and pairs them with new stories from those same individuals and families that bring readers up-to-date on their lives today. Through these stories, plus an interview with the Institute's founding director Bob Bruininks, this *Impact* recognizes the tenacity, courage, and vision of those working to bring about progress toward full citizenship and community inclusion for people with disabilities in the U.S. (Publication Date: May 09, 2014)

Staff: Vicki D Gaylord

Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC-CL) website (2014)

A website presenting the Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC-CL), a center that conducts a wide range of research, training, and technical assistance and dissemination projects related to community supports under its center grant and related project funding. The RTC-CL is NIDILRR's national center on community living and participation for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. RTC-CL is a center within ICI. (Publication Date: January 01, 2014)

Staff: Kristin Dean

Feature Issue on Supporting the Social Well-Being of Children and Youth with Disabilities (Spring/Summer 2011)

A newsletter issue presenting practical and insightful articles about supporting the social well-being of children and youth with intellectual, developmental and other disabilities in the settings where they live their lives: schools, youth programs, neighborhoods, communities, homes. Social well-being is essential to overall health and quality of life for all children and youth. However, children and youth with disabilities are often at higher risk for experiencing lower levels of social, and related emotional, well-being than their peers without disabilities. They are among those more likely to be bullied and harassed, have a small number of friends outside their families, and participate in few extracurricular activities. This means that the adults in their lives need to be proactive in supporting and strengthening the social well-being of these young people. This *Impact* issue focuses on what adults can do to create and sustain environments that contribute to social well-being, rather than social harm, for young people with disabilities and their peers without disabilities. It includes personal stories of young people, their families and friends; practical strategies for school and community settings; research summaries and profiles of successful programs; and resources for use by educators, families, youth leaders, and others who desire to support the social growth and well-being of all our young people. (Publication Date: August 12, 2011)

Staff: Vicki D Gaylord, Brian H Abery

RTC Media website (2015)

A website showcasing films about people with disabilities and those who provide support. Also describes the film-making services available through RTC Media. (Publication Date: January 01, 2010)

Staff: Jerry W Smith

Social Activities of Non-Institutionalized Adults in the NHIS-D: Gender, Age, and Disability Differences (September 2005)

A follow-up brief to issue 3(1) describing the social activities of adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (ID/DD) using the National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplement(NHIS-D). The main finding of that earlier brief was that the most common social activities for individuals with ID/DD were getting together with friends or neighbors, meeting relatives, and talking on the phone with friends or neighbors. This DD Data Brief takes the next step by comparing social activities of adults with ID/DD to those of adults with other types of disabilities. It also uses inferential statistics to identify factors (including work history) associated with differences in social activity participation. (Publication Date: September 01, 2005)

Staff: Sheryl A Larson

Quality Mall (2004 - Present)

An interactive database providing an online clearinghouse of over 3,500 resources from around the country related to person-centered services and supports for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. For use by individuals with disabilities, families, advocates, government officials, and service providers, it covers a wide variety of topical areas related to community participation and inclusion, and quality of life. Quality Mall is managed by the Institute's Research and Training Center on Community Living. (Publication Date: January 01, 2004)

Staff: Claire Cunningham, Angela N Amado, Jerry W Smith, Julie E Dahlof Kramme, John G Smith

Feature Issue on Social Inclusion Through Recreation for Persons with Disabilities (Summer 2003)

A newsletter issue proposing that one way to increase the social inclusion of individuals with disabilities is for children, youth and adults with and without disabilities to play together. While recent decades have witnessed a significant increase in the participation of persons with developmental and other disabilities in regular education classrooms and community workplaces, participation and inclusion are not the same thing. Many individuals with disabilities learn, work, and live alongside nondisabled peers, but too often they have little social connection to and few friendships with those around them. Recreation programs have a number of characteristics that make them ideal places for individuals with disabilities to experience social inclusion and friendship building. The articles in this issue describe those characteristics, strategies for making use of them to enhance the opportunities for meaningful and ongoing social connections between participants with and without disabilities, and barriers to recreation participation that must be addressed. Its goal is to encourage recreation, education, and community services professionals, along with families and individuals with disabilities, to find additional ways in which everyone can experience the benefits of social inclusion. (Publication Date: August 01, 2003)

Staff: Vicki D Gaylord, Brian H Abery