Quality outcomes

Products

Valuing Lives: Wolf Wolfensberger and the Principle of Normalization (2016)

A film documenting the social paradigm shift triggered by Wolf Wolfensberger, a professor and change agent who, in the early 1970s, popularized and expanded the principle of normalization of people with disabilities into a framework for community inclusion. People are often judged according to how they conform to commonly-held beliefs of what is normal - normal appearance, behavior, ability. And those deemed "abnormal" can be considered undeserving of common respect, dignity, and even basic rights. For many with intellectual and developmental disabilities, this has meant segregation, isolation, and exclusion, with little or no opportunity to access the good things in life. Through archival images and footage, and dozens of interviews, *Valuing Lives* explores the principle of normalization, an idea originating in Scandinavia that challenged fundamental assumptions about people with intellectual disabilities, and the iconoclastic professor whose writings and intense workshops trained thousands of human services professionals in the theory and practice of this idea. This brought about a sea change in thinking at a time when it was considered normal to warehouse nearly 200,000 Americans with intellectual disabilities in large institutions. Wolfensberger helped change the conversation from institutional reform to rethinking society's assumptions of disability and the role of human services. There are still institutions for people with intellectual disabilities, and some voices are calling for new, segregated communities where, it is believed, they will be safer "with their own kind." It is time for a new generation of leaders to rediscover the principle of normalization. (Publication Date: April 05, 2016)

Staff: Jerry W Smith

Collaborators: Institute on Disabilities, Temple University [Philadelphia, PA]

Feature Issue on Stories of Advocacy, Stories of Change from People with Disabilities, Their Families, and Allies (1988-2013) (2014)

A newsletter issue featuring then-and-now personal stories from individuals with disabilities, their families, and allies that provide a snapshot of how the disability rights movement has touched individual lives over the past 25 years. This 25th anniversary issue of *Impact* brings together personal stories published in its pages between 1988-2010, and pairs them with new stories from those same individuals and families that bring readers up-to-date on their lives today. Through these stories, plus an interview with the Institute's founding director Bob Bruininks, this *Impact* recognizes the tenacity, courage, and vision of those working to bring about progress toward full citizenship and community inclusion for people with disabilities in the U.S. (Publication Date: May 09, 2014)

Staff: Vicki D Gaylord

Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC-CL) website (2014)

Presents the Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC-CL), a center that conducts a wide range of research, training, and technical assistance and dissemination projects related to community supports under its center grant and related project funding. The RTC-CL is NIDILRR's national center on community living and participation for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. RTC-CL is a center within ICI. (Publication Date: January 01, 2014)

Staff: Kristin Dean

State of the Science: Theories, Concepts, and Evidence Guiding Policy and Practice in Community Living and Participation for People with Intellectual Disabilities (2013)

A set of online video presentations from the July 2012 conference, State of the Science: Outcomes for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Experts in their fields discuss the most influential theories, principles, and "big ideas" that shape policy and practices in community supports for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities around 9 topical areas: 1. Community participation and social inclusion 2. Employment and economic self-sufficiency 3. Family support 4. Health and wellness 5. Methodological issues 6. Outcome data 7. Predictors of outcomes 8. Quality of life indicators 9. Self-determination The videos also include discussions by self-advocates and other stakeholders on many of the topics. (Publication Date: June 03, 2013)

Staff: Kristin Dean, Shawn C Lawler, Jerry W Smith

An Independent Assessment of the Region 10 Quality Assurance Commission Voice Review Program (2008)

A report on the VOICE program, a person-centered quality assurance system that emphasizes self-determination and involves community volunteers, people with disabilities, and professionals to determine the quality of services provided. VOICE was created by the Region 10 Quality Assurance Commission in southeast Minnesota. (Publication Date: April 16, 2008)

Staff: Jerry W Smith, John G Smith

Other Voices: The Minnesota Region 10 Quality Assurance Process (2008)

A documentary video describing how stakeholders in southeastern Minnesota, including parents, advocates, and self-advocates, developed an alternative quality assurance process to better respond to the needs of citizens with developmental disabilities. The system they developed, called VOICE, is a person-driven process that emphasizes self-determination and includes participation by community members, people with disabilities, and professionals in determining the quality of services provided. (Publication Date: January 01, 2008)

Staff: Jerry W Smith

Quality Mall (2004 - Present)

An interactive database providing an online clearinghouse of over 3,500 resources from around the country related to person-centered services and supports for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. For use by individuals with disabilities, families, advocates, government officials, and service providers, it covers a wide variety of topical areas related to community participation and inclusion, and quality of life. Quality Mall is managed by the Institute's Research and Training Center on Community Living. (Publication Date: January 01, 2004)

Staff: Claire Cunningham, Angela N Amado, Julie E Kramme, John G Smith